The drama set in Manchester is part of 8 series unveiled by the BBC.

Modern dating can be an isolating, lonely experience, where feelings are hidden and meaningful connections always seem just out of reach. But Domino has one small advantage in the dating game: she isn’t swiping to find her soulmate— she’s using it to hunt. Domino is a powerful young witch who is haunted by her need to feed on the energy of others. A hunger that only grows, despite her attempt to start her life over in Manchester, where she is desperately seeking a community who can help her understand what is happening to her. But Domino doesn’t need to try so hard… a coven of witches are already tracking her every move, convinced they have to stop her before her powers destroy everyone and everything around her.

Domino Day is written by BBC’s emerging talent Lauren Sequeira who wrote an episode of E4/Netflix thriller Kiss Me First for Balloon Entertainment/Kindle and Pandora, a new series with Sister Pictures for AMC. She also created the Bafta Nominated digital spin-off series to the BBC’s The Dumping GroundSasha’s Contact Meeting. Her original TV series Cleo, a gangland re-imagining of Queen Cleopatra’s story, was one of three scripts shortlisted for the Green Door/Lionsgate ‘Write to Green Light’ initiative and is currently being developed by Little Dot Studios.
Lauren is also developing original series with New Pictures, Caryn Mandabach Productions, Vertigo Films, and Dancing Ledge, where she was Writer in Residence and has written Episode 6 of Gangs of London for Pulse Films/Sister Pictures/Sky.

Domino Day is Executive Produced by Lucy Richer and Ayela Butt for the BBC, Laurence Bowen and Chris Carey for Dancing Ledge Productions, and Sequeira.

Sequeira says: “I’m over the (full) moon to be doing this project with the BBC and Dancing Ledge Productions, who have really championed my career from the start. I wanted to write a supernatural series that wasn’t only thrilling and twisty, but also tapped into the very real dating scene and how it affects modern relationships.

The project was announced by BBC drama director Piers Wenger and are designed to mark his unit’s contribution to BBC plans to produce more in the UK’s nations and regions.