What To Watch On Stage July 2023

Theatre highlights this July include Beneatha’s Place written and directed by Kwame Kwei-Armah …

If you want to catch the remainder of Brixton House Theatre’s Housemates Festival running until July 23rd then check out Daniel Ward’s Everything I Own (19-22 July) and Tobi King Bakare’s Before I Go (18-22 July). And we know you seen the rave reviews that Beneatha’s Place at the Young Vic, don’t miss out.

Beneatha’s Place Written and directed by Kwame Kwei-Armah

A razor-sharp satire from Young Vic Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah, about the power of knowing your history and the cost of letting it go.

The first wave of independence is sweeping across Africa and Beneatha has left the prejudice of 1950s America for a brighter future with her Nigerian husband in Lagos. But on the day they move into their new house in the white suburbs, it doesn’t take long for cracks to appear, changing the course of the rest of their lives.

Present day. Now a renowned Dean whose colleagues are questioning the role of African American studies for future generations, Beneatha returns to the same house in search of answers.

Beneatha’s Place runs at the Young Vic from 27th Jun 2023 – 5th Aug 2023.

Book tickets and find out more here.


Grenfell: in the words of survivors co-directed by Anthony Simpson-Pike

It was my safest place. It was home.

A powerful new verbatim play from the testimony of residents at the heart of the Grenfell Tower tragedy.

Six years on, interviews conducted with a group of survivors and bereaved reveal the impact of the multiple failures that led to a national disaster, asking: how do we stop this ever happening again?

Startling and deeply moving, it explores the courage and resilience of an ill-treated community and their continued campaign for justice.

Starring Pearl Mackie.

Grenfell: In the words of survivors runs at the National Theatre from 13th July — 26th August 2023.

Book tickets and find out more here.


Housemates Festival 2023: Before I Go by Writer and Performer: Tobi King Bakare directed by Director: Ozioma Ihesiene

Follow Ajani, a young boy who tragically dies and gets stuck in limbo and forced to undergo overcoming and acceptance in order to be revived into the living world.

Ajani can talk. He can host parties, talk to girls, charm any living being. However, he finds it hard to express himself to the people he cares about the most. When he dies and gets stuck in Limbo, he is given an ultimatum: “Learn how to ‘properly’ communicate or remain here forever”. Ajani takes on the quest and embarks on a poetic journey of discovery, unlearning and healing.

In Ajani’s reflection, he teaches us not be afraid to express ourselves even with the many barriers we may face.

Focussing on being black, male and working class.

Before I Go runs at Brixton House from 18th July – 22nd July

Book tickets and find out more here.


Housemates Festival 2023: Everything I Own written by Daniel Ward

Errol lost his Dad last year. Listening to his old man’s Spotify playlist, he remembers his Dad’s passion over the 1981 Brixton uprising and his certainty that change coming.

Errol lost his Dad last year. Listening to his old man’s Spotify playlist, he remembers his Dad’s passion over the 1981 Brixton uprising and his certainty that change coming. Errol is tired of the fight, and as his son takes up the fight with the BLM movement, he questions if this is a revolution or a repetition.

Everything I Own runs at Brixton House from 19th July – 22nd July

Book tickets and find out more here.


Word-Play Written by Rabiah Hussain directed by Nimmo Ismail

We’ve got another 10 minutes before shit really hits the fan.”

In the Downing Street Press Office an emergency meeting has been called. The Prime Minister has been ad-libbing on live tv (again) and his words are going viral. There is a flurry of accusations, and demands for an apology; but as the team debate what to do next, it’s already too late. His words have found their way to dinner parties, bus journeys and newspaper columns across the nation – and not everyone is angry.

Explores how language seeps into public consciousness and reverberates with far reaching consequences that will last for generations.

Starring Simon Manyonda and Kosar Ali.

Word-Play runs at the Royal Courts Jerwood Theatre from Thursday 20th July – Saturday 26th August

Book tickets and find out more here.


waiting for a train at the bus stop. By Mwansa Phiri

This is a dark comedy, one woman theatre show that interweaves spoken-word poetry and Zambian storytelling traditions to tell a story about a woman trapped in a controlling relationship. It explores the connection between cultural identity, coercive control and mental health.

waiting for a train at the bus stop follows Chilufya – meaning ‘the lost one’ – which makes perfect sense as that is how she has felt most of her life. Struggling with low self-esteem and a waning sense of self she finds herself being drawn into a controlling relationship.

As part of her research, Mwansa attended training delivered by Sistah Space, a London-based domestic violence charity that provides specialist services to women of African and Caribbean heritage.

This powerful new play interweaves spoken-word poetry with Zambian oral storytelling traditions to tell a gripping story about cultural identity and the connection between mental health and coercive control.

London Preview: Wednesday 26th July, 19:30 (60mins) at Streatham Space Project

Edinburgh Fringe Festival Wednesday 2nd August – Sunday 27th August (not 14 or 21)

Get a 15% discount code using CHILI15 here.

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